My Book: Windows and Doors of the Camino de Santiago

Ultreïa et Suseïa. Onwards and Upwards. An exchange between pilgrims – one says “Ultreïa,” the other says “et Suseïa.” Encouraging each other to keep going, to walk further. In my interpretation, to keep moving forward, and to strive higher.

Camino de Santiago Windows and Doors

In my new book, “Windows and Doors of the Camino de Santiago,” I talk about these great words, Ultreïa et Suseïa. I also have 285 pictures of the best of the best of the best of my 1,300 windows and doors photographs from my Camino de Santiago walks. Windows and doors are my favorite subject to photograph when I travel.

Camino de Santiago Windows and Doors

Camino de Santiago Windows and Doors

In my book, there are a variety of pictures about windows and doors…for example, many with beautiful flowers and plants…some with geometric patterns…some modern, some old and abandoned…some with chairs and benches…some with hearts…and windows and doors that anyone who has walked the Camino would be able to relate to and recognize – with the symbolic scallop shell, the directional yellow arrow, the stone marker, churches and chapels, street names, images of Santiago, even backpacks and encouraging words of wisdom.

Camino de Santiago Windows and Doors

Camino de Santiago Windows and Doors

Camino de Santiago Windows and Doors

Camino de Santiago Windows and Doors

Translated into Spanish as well, whether you have walked some or all of the many Camino de Santiago pilgrimage routes; or are preparing to make a journey; or even if you have an interest in the Camino de Santiago, Spain, or windows and doors, I hope the pictures in my book either bring back enchanting memories, or are inspiring to you.

Camino de Santiago Windows and Doors

Camino de Santiago Windows and Doors

Camino de Santiago Windows and Doors

Camino de Santiago Windows and Doors

Camino de Santiago Windows and Doors

Camino de Santiago Windows and Doors

Camino de Santiago Windows and Doors

Camino de Santiago Windows and Doors

“Windows and Doors of the Camino de Santiago” is available on Amazon for $15.00.

Buen Camino!

Sweet Travels!

For more blogs about my 502-mile, 47-day journey across northern Spain and up the Atlantic Coast, please visit my Camino de Santiago category.

 

Windows and Doors of the Cotswolds – The Churches

A Collection of Photographs of the Quintessential Colorful Flowers and Honey-Colored Cotswold Stone in the Land of Market Towns, Wool Churches, and Sheep Hills in England’s Countryside

Windows and Doors of the Cotswolds

My husband and I loved the churches the most. We would spend no less than an hour at each one, and we saw no less than 39 of them in our 12 days of walking in the Cotswolds. We usually stayed long enough to hear the church bells ring several times, including at the top of the hour.

Windows and Doors of the Cotswolds

I was fascinated with the architecture, art, stained glass, religious relics, and the interior feel of each historic church. My husband was interested in reading practically each and every old legible tombstone. Together, we appreciated the religion, spirituality, and grand thousand-year-old history.

Windows and Doors of the Cotswolds

Thus the second and third sections in my latest travel photography book, “Windows and Doors of the Cotswolds,” contain pictures of interior windows, and exterior windows and doors, of the churches we visited in the Cotswolds.

Windows and Doors of the Cotswolds

The Cotswolds is a region in England that is designated as an “Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.” The Cotswolds contain 3,000 miles of public footpaths and roads, trails and tracks, that take you through farmland and pastures, fields and crops, rolling hills and valleys, open grasslands and gardens, forests and huge flowering trees, parks, nature reserves, wildflowers, and rivers and streams. Passing through gates, kissing gates, and stiles, you wander through timeless villages, small hamlets, and medieval market towns, sprinkled with these historical churches.

Windows and Doors of the Cotswolds

Pictures in the first section of my book are from homes and buildings, as featured in my previous blog. Most pictures in this section reflect the quintessential contrasting and complementary colors of the flowers and plants that literally grow on and climb the walls of the honey- and golden-colored “Cotswold Stone” of the homes and buildings.

Windows and Doors of the Cotswolds

With over 375 photographs in 192 unnumbered pages, my third travel photography book is my representation of the Cotswolds as seen through its windows and doors, my favorite subject to photograph when I travel.

Windows and Doors of the Cotswolds

My book will take you on a journey through the beautiful and timeless Cotswolds through its windows and doors. My book is available on Amazon.

Windows and Doors of the Cotswolds

Windows and Doors of the Cotswolds

Sweet Travels!

For other blogs from our Cotswolds travels, please visit my Cotswolds England category.

Windows and Doors of the Cotswolds

A Collection of Photographs of the Quintessential Colorful Flowers and Honey-Colored Cotswold Stone in the Land of Market Towns, Wool Churches, and Sheep Hills in England’s Countryside

Cotswolds Windows and Doors

What my husband and I loved during our 12 days of walking in the Cotswolds was the quintessential contrasting and complementary colors of the flowers and plants that literally grow on and climb the walls of the honey- and golden-colored “Cotswold Stone” of the buildings. This stone, a Jurassic limestone rich in fossils, is used for houses, barns, stone walls, and churches. The flowers and plants that decorate the walls include purple wisteria, red and yellow roses, pink tulips, peach and white colored flowers, green foliage, and more, or any combination thereof.

Cotswolds Windows and Doors

The Cotswolds is a region in England that is designated as an “Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.” The Cotswolds contain 3,000 miles of public footpaths and roads, trails and tracks, that take you through farmland and pastures, fields and crops, rolling hills and valleys, open grasslands and gardens, forests and huge flowering trees, parks, nature reserves, wildflowers, and rivers and streams. Passing through gates, kissing gates, and stiles, you wander through timeless villages, small hamlets, and medieval market towns, sprinkled with historical churches.

Cotswolds Windows and Doors

During our walks, I took pictures of windows and doors, my favorite subject to photograph when I travel. These pictures have turned into my latest travel photography book, “Windows and Doors of the Cotswolds.”

Cotswolds Windows and Doors

The pictures in my book are divided into three sections. The first section contains photos of windows and doors, along with the harmonizing flowers and stone, of homes and buildings in the Cotswolds. Samples from this first section are shown in this blog. My next blog contains samples from the other two sections of my book, interior and exterior windows and doors of churches.

Cotswolds Windows and Doors

Throughout the book, pictures may also contain no flowers at all, just showing the “Cotswold Stone.” Pictures are also of other themes, such as objects displayed in windows, benches or chairs, red telephone or mail boxes, watering cans or milk jugs, horseshoes, candles, or white picket fences. And more.

Cotswolds Windows and Doors

With over 375 photographs in 192 unnumbered pages, my third travel photography book is my representation of the Cotswolds as seen through its windows and doors, and will take you on a journey through the beautiful and timeless Cotswolds through its windows and doors.

Cotswolds Windows and Doors

My book is available on Amazon.

Cotswolds Windows and Doors

Cotswolds Windows and Doors

Sweet Travels!

For other blogs from our Cotswolds travels, please visit my Cotswolds England category.

A Thunderstorm, an Island, a Porch, and a Photography Book about The Porches of Île d’Orléans

I fell in love with the homes of Île d’Orléans, with their grand architecture. Not knowing much of the history of the island yet, I remember feeling like I was swept back in time, to an era of centuries ago. To an era of people savoring the outdoors and food of their island. To a place where the home was for family and friends visiting, sitting, talking, laughing, eating. All outdoors on a grand, inviting, hospitable porch.  – Debby Lee Jagerman-Dungan

The Porches of Ile d'Orleans Book

It was a dark and stormy afternoon. Which was odd, because the rest of the day, and most of the previous two days, it had been sunny and quite warm. At first it started to rain lightly. I took my rain jacket out of my backpack to cover myself, put a pack cover over my backpack, and continued on with my walking. I had just left the Les Fromages de l’Îsle d’Orléans, tasting several delicious types of locally made cheese, along with some grapes and crackers, which made a delicious snack. A few moments later, it began to rain harder. I took shelter under a tree to put on my rain pants, and to protect my camera and cell phone. I then set out for the last few miles of my 10 miles of walking for the day.

Sneaking in a few pictures in between the rain drops of a roadside cross, one of several scattered throughout the island, the rain began to pour harder, coming down in buckets. Hiding my camera once again, I saw an open barn of a farm and took shelter, along with two bicyclists. All of us hoping that the rain would lighten up. We waited. And waited. And waited.

I knew I didn’t have much further to go on my walk that day, and since I was walking the entire 42-mile Chemin Royal, the road that encircles Île d’Orléans, an island near Quebec City, Canada, I didn’t want to miss a single step. So I decided to stick it out, and kept on walking. Even with the rain that felt like I was now under a waterfall.

Porches of Ile d'Orleans

And then it began. The thunder. And lightning. Ok, I thought, not much further now. I can handle this. I persisted on until I saw one of the dozens of food specialty shops on the island. For some relief from the rain, I took shelter in La Halte des Anges, a shop that sells pies, jams, and jellies prepared from fresh local strawberries. This reminded me of all the fresh fruits and vegetables grown on the island that I had been experiencing during my days walking, available to purchase at roadside stands, pick-your-own, or created into so many delectable products. La Halte des Anges also sold lavender products also made on the island. I could smell the aroma, just as I had smelled earlier that day, as I had walked amongst a 10-acre garden of lavender, with 75,000 lavender plants at Seigneurie de l’île d’Orléans. Ironic that the loose translation of the name La Halte des Anges is “The Stopping Place of Angels.” Just what I needed, some guardian angels watching over me as the rain, thunder, and lightning would not let up.

Porches of Ile d'Orleans

It was getting to be near 5:00 now, and the shop was closing. So once again, I trudged on. Not wanting to miss a single step. But the thunder and lightning struck again. And again. And again. I began counting the seconds in between, remembering from my childhood that the fewer the seconds in between, the closer the storm. Three seconds. Two seconds. One second! Too close for comfort. Now what do I do? Although I knew I was close to my destination for the evening, I really didn’t exactly know how much further. A mile? A half a mile? I stuck my thumb out hoping to hitch a ride. No luck.

Then I saw a home. A home with a porch. A porch similar to the ones that I had been photographing dozens, no hundreds, of times during my walk around Île d’Orléans. A grand, inviting, hospitable porch, like the ones I just published in my book, “The Porches of Île d’Orléans: Seeing the Island through its Windows and Doors while Walking Chemin Royal.” (Available on Amazon.) Part of my journey around the island, aside from visiting as many of its forty food specialty shops and restaurants, bakeries, wineries, chocolateries, and twenty arts and crafts boutiques and galleries as I could, was also taking photographs of windows and doors, my favorite subject when I travel. This island has a 350-year old New France history, culture, religion, and architecture. With many homes built in the 19th, 18th, even 17th centuries, based on this New France architectural style, and some in a Québécois style, they included porches.

Porches of Ile d'Orleans

But this porch was a bit different. It was shelter, once again. I ran under it, dripping, no sopping wet. Not really minding that I myself was wet, but more trying to protect my camera and cell phone, even with it being protected already. I sat on a chair that was under the porch. I began to dream of the locally made double chocolate and hazelnut-chocolate ice creams I had earlier in the day at the Chocolaterie de l’Île d’Orléans.

Trying to figure out what to do next, in between the loud thunder, trying to think, decide. I could no longer see the fields and crops of the farmland landscape of the island. I could no longer see the mountains of Québec Province in the background, or the waters of the Saint Lawrence River surrounding the island. Île d’Orléans is an island where there are no fences between the homes and farms, where people leave their clothes hanging out on lines to dry in the fresh air. It is an island with 600 historic buildings and monuments, including parish churches and chapels. I had to breathe.

Porches of Ile d'Orleans

I decided to call the bed and breakfast that I was staying at that night, to see if they could come pick me up. I dialed, she answered. But the sound of the thunder was too loud. She could not hear me. The connection was bad. I hung up and tried again. Nope, same thing. She could not understand my need for a ride. I sat hoping the rain, and thunder, and lightning would stop.

Nope. No such luck. The thunder. The lightning. Right there. I have never been caught in a storm such as this, even in all my walking travels. Even in all my hiking and backpacking trips in the mountains.

Porches of Ile d'Orleans

Finally, noticing the garage and the car next to the porch that I was taking shelter under, I thought, aha! Perhaps the people who live in this home could take me to where I wanted to go. I knocked. On the door. A man answered. And his wife in the background. Yes! I thought. But alas, as I rattled my story to them in English, dripping wet…I’m-walking-the-island-I-have-no-bicycle-no-car-it-is-raining-no-it-is-pouring-it-is-thundering-and-lightning-and-I-am-hoping-you-could-please-give-me-a-ride-to-my-bed-and-breakfast…they looked at me like I was crazy. Well, not that I was crazy, but they just didn’t understand. They only spoke French.

Porches of Ile d'Orleans

So I began to use my best sign language, a language hopefully that we shared in common. As the thunder and lightening struck, and startled us all, I gestured out and pointed to the rain. They knew that. I pointed to my dripping self. They saw that. I used my index and middle finger, pointing downwards, moving side by side, to indicate walking. They seemed to get that. I pointed to their car, and used my arms and fists rotating to symbolize driving. They got that! And I pointed to the name of the bed and breakfast on my itinerary. Yes, he understood! I was rescued from the storm!

The kind gentleman went to get his keys and his rain jacket, and drove me, what turned out to be no more than a half mile to my bed and breakfast. I thanked him as best I could. Merci beaucoup! Merci beaucoup! Merci beaucoup! A thousand times.

Porches of Ile d'Orleans

The next morning, the woman at the bed and breakfast kindly drove me back to that home with the grand, inviting, hospitable porch that I took shelter under, so that I could begin my walk from where I left off, in the warm sun, on my final day of walking around the 42-mile road encircling Île d’Orléans. So as not to miss a single step, so that I could resume exploring all that this island has to offer, and so that I could continue taking pictures of the grand, inviting, hospitable porches.

Sweet Travels!

The Porches of Île d’Orléans: Seeing the Island through its Windows and Doors while Walking Chemin Royal” is my travel photography book that contains over 100 pictures of the windows, doors, and porches of the island. I even found a website that told me the year of construction of many of the homes, and I have included these years in the book. For example, homes that were built in 1920, 1900, 1890, 1865, 1777, 1700, and earlier. The book is in both English and French. Available on Amazon.

By the way, for privacy purposes, I have not included a picture the porch that I took shelter under in this blog. It is in the book though, but not identified.

Inspired from my walk around the 42-mile Chemin Royal, as well as from a song written by a French-Canadian singer-songwriter, Félix Leclerc, where he describes Île d’Orléans as “42 miles of quiet things,” I came up with “42 Reasons to Visit Île d’Orléans.” And a “Travel Guide to Île d’Orléans,” and “Tips for Walking Île d’Orléans” to assist you with your journey to the island.

Here is a list of my 42 reasons to visit Île d’Orléans, as well as a few other blogs, including My Travel Guide, My Tips for Walking, My Walking Tour, and My Book!!

My Travel Guide to Île d’Orléans.
Tips for Walking Île d’Orléans.
My Windows and Doors Photography Book, “The Porches of Île d’Orléans.”
My Walking Tour.

#1. The Quiet.
#2 through #4. The Chocolate Shops.
#5 through #10. The Wineries, Cidreries, and Vinaigreries.
#11 through #16. The Churches.
#17. The Aroma of Lavender.
#18 and #19. Recycled Folk Art and Textile Weaving.
#20. Strawberry Season.
#21 and #22. Strawberries, Raspberries, and Blackcurrants. Oh my!
#23. The Mailboxes.
#24 and #25. The Art in the Garden and The Garden of Arts.
#26 and #27. Procession Chapels and Roadside Crosses.
#28 and #29. Maple Syrup and Cheese.
#30. Parc Maritime/Maritime History.
#31 and #32. Woodworking and Blacksmithing.
#33 and #34. The Farmland and The River Scenery.
#35 and #36. Fine Dining.
#37 through #40. Accommodations.
#41 and #42. The Porches and My “Final” Reason.

The Porches of Île d’Orléans, and My “Final” Reason (out of 42) to Visit Île d’Orléans

June 2014 update to this blog: The travel photography book project that I mention in this blog that I had wanted to create is done! It is called, “The Porches of Île d’Orléans: Seeing the Island through its Windows and Doors while walking Chemin Royal,” and it is available on Amazon.

Ile d'Orleans Porches

The porches of Île d’Orléans. With their brilliant and varied colors, their adorned windows and doors, the decorations of flowers and other items displayed on the porches, and their many places to sit and relax. I just loved photographing as many porches as I could during my 42-mile walk around Chemin Royal (Royal Road) that encircles Île d’Orléans. And I photographed a lot of them! So my 41st reason, out of my 42 reasons to visit Île d’Orléans, is the fabulous porches.

 

Ile d'Orleans Porches

I wanted to learn more about the homes of Île d’Orléans, knowing that this island is full of history, so I did some research. From an interesting website I found on the family history and genealogy of the Lachance and Bussell families, of which the Lachance family has ancestors who lived on the island in the 1600’s, I discovered this from their Île d’Orléans history page: The architecture on Île d’Orléans “has a 350-year-old history. Many of the buildings have been deemed of great historical value. The first houses were patterned after the French houses that they were familiar with in France. The houses were small and centered around a fireplace that was used both for heat and cooking. They were built of wood with thatched roofs. As time passed they designed houses that were larger and more adapted to the weather conditions.” I find this kind of information completely fascinating.

This website also noted that on Île d’Orléans, “There are over 600 historically important buildings on the island, and strict controls have ensured that even new buildings adhere to the original character.”

 

Ile d'Orleans Porches

A few other websites explain that possibly many of the houses date back to the French Régime of the 18th century, some follow traditional New France architecture, or are also done in a “Québécois style,” which can be described as a style with open porches, and where “windows and doors were often outlined in color.”

 

Ile d'Orleans Porches

For fun, I also did a search and came across a few websites with homes currently for sale on Île d’Orléans. They advertise the property style of some homes as “heritage” or “ancestral,” with some for sale that were built back in 1820, 1821, 1847, 1889, and even 1786. How cool is that!

 

Ile d'Orleans Porches

I loved photographing these fabulous porches of Île d’Orléans! With the pictures in this blog, plus with the many, many more photos I took, I plan on creating a photography book on the porches, windows, and doors of Île d’Orléans. I am very excited about this project, and will post a blog when it is complete!

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And now…my “final” reason to visit Île d’Orléans…

I have written 41 reasons to visit Île d’Orléans. Ranging from the quiet, to the farmland and river scenery, to the many, many various arts and crafts. Ranging from the fresh roadside fruit stands, to the chocolate shops, to the maple syrup and cheese, to the fine dining in restaurants. From the aroma of lavender, to the wineries, cidreries, and vinaigraries. From the religion of the churches, procession chapels, and roadside crosses, to the restful accommodations. From the maritime history, to the mailboxes, and to the porches.

 

Ile d'Orleans Porches

However, the reasons go on. And on. And on. So my 42nd reason to visit Île d’Orléans is ALL the other reasons that I did not mention in my series of blogs. For example, there are many other specialty arts and crafts boutiques and galleries; there are antique stores; there are many other restaurants, bistros, cafés, and pubs. There are many more accommodations; a few other churches; and some historical homes to visit. There are other places that specialize in agri-tourism and specialty food shops, with an abundance of fresh fruits and vegetables depending on the season; there is a duck and geese farm; other wineries and breweries; bakeries; a fish shop and a place to go fishing; a theater and a museum; a genealogy center; a grocery store. One can take excursions on the Saint Lawrence River to other islands, play a round of golf, climb an observation tower, and visit a small petting zoo. There is a summer and day camp for children, a book store in a park, and depending on what month you are there, you may come across a special event. Based on this list, I’m sure that I could come up with another 42 reasons to visit Île d’Orléans and write a second series of blogs.

 

Ile d'Orleans Porches

The reason that I chose to write about “42” reasons to visit Île d’Orléans is because of the “42” mile Chemin Royal that encircles the island. I used mileage as my measurement because I live in the United States, where we measure in miles. However, if I lived in Canada, I would be using kilometers instead of miles. In kilometers, Chemin Royal is 67. Therefore, I suppose I could have done a series of blogs on the “67 reasons to visit Île d’Orléans” instead, and would have filled each and every reason. Again, my 42nd reason to visit Île d’Orléans is ALL the other reasons to visit this amazing island.

 

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Ok. I will throw in a bonus, a 43rd reason to visit Île d’Orléans – it’s close proximity to Québec City. In fact, you are more likely to visit Québec City first, as it would be your gateway to get to Île d’Orléans. And believe me, there are almost certainly 42 reasons to visit Québec City as well.

 

Ile d'Orleans Porches

Now that my series of reasons to visit Île d’Orléans is complete, I will actually be doing two more blogs on the island. The next blog is a “tips on walking” the island. I am one of the few to walk the island, as traveling by car or bicycle are more common, and I will share a few words of wisdom my from experience. My final blog will be a recap of all my reasons – kind of like a one-stop travel guide, helping with organizing your trip to Île d’Orléans.

 

Ile d'Orleans Porches

Before I end this blog however, I will say that I love Île d’Orléans. I fell in love with the island several years ago when I had the chance to visit for the first time, for only an hour. In that hour I knew I wanted to go back. Then earlier this summer, I had the chance to go back. Four days of walking the 42 miles. Taking notes for these blogs; taking thousands of pictures; talking to many people who work and live on the island; enjoying the scenery; learning about the history, culture, religion; visiting the shops and galleries and boutiques; eating and eating and sleeping, etc., etc., etc. At only about 73 square miles, this tiny island offers so much for the visitor. All I can say to end this series of blogs is that I would love to go back to Île d’Orléans yet again to see what else I can discover, and to come up with even more reasons to visit Île d’Orléans.

 

Ile d'Orleans Porches

(Oh, and I would love to buy one of those ancestral homes from the 18th or 19th centuries, with those fabulous porches.)

Sweet Travels!

Here is a list of my 42 reasons to visit Île d’Orléans, as well as a few other blogs, including My Travel Guide, My Tips for Walking, My Walking Tour, and My Book!!

My Travel Guide to Île d’Orléans.
Tips for Walking Île d’Orléans.
My Windows and Doors Photography Book, “The Porches of Île d’Orléans.”
My Walking Tour.

#1. The Quiet.
#2 through #4. The Chocolate Shops.
#5 through #10. The Wineries, Cidreries, and Vinaigreries.
#11 through #16. The Churches.
#17. The Aroma of Lavender.
#18 and #19. Recycled Folk Art and Textile Weaving.
#20. Strawberry Season.
#21 and #22. Strawberries, Raspberries, and Blackcurrants. Oh my!
#23. The Mailboxes.
#24 and #25. The Art in the Garden and The Garden of Arts.
#26 and #27. Procession Chapels and Roadside Crosses.
#28 and #29. Maple Syrup and Cheese.
#30. Parc Maritime/Maritime History.
#31 and #32. Woodworking and Blacksmithing.
#33 and #34. The Farmland and The River Scenery.
#35 and #36. Fine Dining.
#37 through #40. Accommodations.
#41 and #42. The Porches and My “Final” Reason.

My walking tour of Île d’Orléans was sponsored by Tourisme Québec (Québec Original) and Québec City Tourism (Québec Region). For more information, please visit:

Tourisme Île d’Orléans
Quebéc Region
Quebéc Region-Québec City and Area-Île d’Orléans
Quebéc Original